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Gates Grant to Help Georgia Tech Develop Online Courses

Date: 
Friday, November 16, 2012

Colleges will offer courses to ACE for potential accreditation and Tech is studying this option, said Richard DeMillo, director of the institute’s Center for 21st Century Universities.

That credit review — combined with the type of courses Georgia Tech and others will develop through the Gates Foundation — unites the MOOC movement with the state and national completion agenda, a push to have more adults earn some type of certificate or degree beyond a high school diploma.

“These Gates Foundation awards address one of higher education’s most pressing problems: bending the cost curve and improving learning outcomes for introductory courses,” DeMillo said. “If we are successful, courses like these will be a shift in both quality and cost for the vast majority of American college students.”

Elite Education for the Masses

Date: 
Saturday, November 3, 2012

“Students and families that are being asked to pony up $150,000 or $200,000 for a credential are going to start asking, ‘What’s the value of this thing?’ ” said Richard A. DeMillo, director of the Center for 21st Century Universities at Georgia Tech, which is part of the Coursera venture.

Keeping Technology Promises: Considering New Models for Educational Technology and Methods

Date: 
Thursday, November 1, 2012

Authored by Richard DeMillo, this article appeared in the Association for Computing Machinery's journal Communications of the ACM, Volume 55 Issue 11, November 2012, Pages 37-39.
 
There is a collapse of confidence under way in U.S. colleges and universities. It is a collapse that has been documented in what seems like a steady stream of recent reports and books, including my own. Amid the many dire warnings there is one bright thread: advances in information technology are often viewed as a pathway to rebuilding public confidence in higher education by reducing costs, expanding access, improving outcomes, and increasing financial transparency. If technology could help rebuild public confidence, higher education would be better off for it, but without more engagement from the research community in attacking the problems facing the nation’s colleges and universities I am not optimistic that will happen.

What Will Higher Education Look Like in 25 Years?

Date: 
Thursday, November 1, 2012

Professor Richard DeMillo is director of the Center for 21st Century Universities at the Georgia Institute of Technology and author of Abelard to Apple: The Fate of American Colleges and Universities. He argues that traditional universities will have little place in a new world, at least as they appear and function today. The technology-mediated education road is the way to go.

UC Online Strives to Compete in an Era of Free Courses

Date: 
Monday, October 1, 2012

Richard A. DeMillo, director of the Center for 21st Century Universities at the Georgia Institute of Technology, said he has heard "relatively little" about the UC Online project. "Our peer institutions have looked at the business plan, and decided to go in a different direction," he said.

Delivery of College Courses Online Will Benefit Businesses

Date: 
Friday, September 14, 2012

Richard DeMillo has spent most of his career thinking about disruption, and he has observed disruptive ideas while working in business, government and now in academia. Now the director of the Center for 21st Century Universities at the Georgia Institute of Technology, he previously worked as chief technology officer for Hewlett-Packard Co., where he had worldwide responsibility for technology and technology strategies. He also has directed the Computer and Computer Research Division of the National Science Foundation.

Why America's Top Colleges Offer Free Classes Online

Date: 
Saturday, September 1, 2012

WHAT’S IN IT FOR COLLEGES?

Prestige now, and possibly profit later. Schools say they’re willing to give their product away for free so they don’t miss the chance to be among the first to develop new forms of education. “The potential upside for this experiment is so big that it’s hard for me to imagine any large research university that wouldn’t want to be involved,” said Richard DeMillo, director of the Center for 21st Century Universities at Georgia Tech. One day the schools will likely try to make some money, too, possibly by charging students for credits or allowing companies to sponsor courses. But universities recognize that they could be jeopardizing their hard-won reputations and their time-tested business model, said Jason Wingard, a vice dean of the University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School. “You run the risk of potentially diluting your brand.” 

Virtual Princeton: A Guide to Free Online Ivy League Classes

Date: 
Friday, August 31, 2012

What's in it for colleges?

Prestige now, and possibly profit later. Schools say they're willing to give their product away for free so they don't miss the chance to be among the first to develop new forms of education. "The potential upside for this experiment is so big that it's hard for me to imagine any large research university that wouldn't want to be involved," said Richard DeMillo, director of the Center for 21st Century Universities at Georgia Tech. One day the schools will likely try to make some money, too, possibly by charging students for credits or allowing companies to sponsor courses. But universities recognize that they could be jeopardizing their hard-won reputations and their time-tested business model, said Jason Wingard, a vice dean of the University of Pennsylvania's Wharton School. "You run the risk of potentially diluting your brand."

Into the Unknown: The Future of Education

Date: 
Thursday, August 23, 2012

In the late 11th century, a teenaged philosopher named Peter Abelard left his home in Le Pallet, France, and traveled to Paris. At the time, the French capital city was one of the world’s leading centers of thought, and its brightest minds held the philosophy of Realism to be sacrosanct. But Abelard had other ideas.

Elite Colleges Transform Online Higher Education

Date: 
Sunday, August 5, 2012

Coursera is exploring ways to generate revenue, including charging students for certificates and charging employers who want to identify top students.

Faced with a shortage of engineering talent, many tech companies have already asked for introductions to students who successfully completed his online course, Ng said. Some students told him they landed new jobs after showing employers their Coursera certificates.

The Georgia Institute of Technology plans to offer five Coursera courses this fall, said Richard DeMillo, a computer science professor who heads the Center for 21st Century Universities.

"We're in the middle of a potentially groundbreaking experiment," DeMillo said. "Really big things could come out of it."

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