WHAT’S IN IT FOR COLLEGES?

Prestige now, and possibly profit later. Schools say they’re willing to give their product away for free so they don’t miss the chance to be among the first to develop new forms of education. “The potential upside for this experiment is so big that it’s hard for me to imagine any large research university that wouldn’t want to be involved,” said Richard DeMillo, director of the Center for 21st Century Universities at Georgia Tech. One day the schools will likely try to make some money, too, possibly by charging students for credits or allowing companies to sponsor courses. But universities recognize that they could be jeopardizing their hard-won reputations and their time-tested business model, said Jason Wingard, a vice dean of the University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School. “You run the risk of potentially diluting your brand.”